Thursday, July 21, 2011

Say Yes To Life -- Freedom



Today, the National Women’s Law Center will be co-hosting a blog carnival with Planned Parenthood to discuss the upcoming decision by the Department of Health and Human Services on which preventive services will be covered without a co-pay by all new health insurance plans.  They are hoping and actively working to get artificial contraception, namely the prescription birth control pill, on that list, and have titled their event “Birth Control: We’ve Got you Covered.”

So this is the response. A pro-life, open-to-life blog carnival. Click here for more.
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I've already ranted about the ridiculous birth control commercials that feed our culture with untrue, blissful ideas of "freedom." Whether it be condoms, "the pill," an IUD, or the shots that trick your body into thinking it's pregnant, I stand in opposition to their fake "promises."

What about the flip side? What about the results of these commercials and the messages pushed by the birth control agenda? Who do they affect?

I've heard birth control be likened to the "greatest invention of the 20th century," especially for women. I've heard the arguments about how the existence of birth control is something I'm "just going to have to accept." I've been accused of neglecting to think about the poorer community or of judging those who do not have my beliefs and therefore don't agree with me.

I've been asked questions like, "Don't you know what having a lot of kids does to a woman?" Questions like, "Are you naive enough to think that you can be married and not have sex when you want to?" Things like, "What about over-population?" And finally, "Don't you think you should keep your opinion to your unmarried self?"

To the last question, I can only smile.

It saddens me to think that the culture of convenience and reverence to "science" and technology above all else has caused people in our society to neglect some of the most basic and natural parts of life.

Secularism tends to make some people more comfortable. God gave us the ability to find Him, no matter how hard we try to avoid Him, so I'll stay secular for five minutes.

Sex between a man and a woman has several results and purposes:
  • It bonds a man and a woman.
  • It can provide pleasure for a man and a woman.
  • It can result in a child; it always has the possibility of producing a child, no matter what time of the month it occurs or what precautions have been made to prevent a child from being produced.
These are biological results, broken down to their most simple forms.
I don't own the rights.

Chemical or barrier contraceptives attempt to divide an entire purpose from sex. This is spiritually unhealthy for a couple because they are interrupting something that would otherwise be a natural expression of their life outside of the bedroom.

Having sex as often as possible with reckless abandon, or anything more than in the infertile times of the month, while using contraception isn't a total example of Love for the simple fact that it leaves out part of sex's purpose.

It also invites lust, which would otherwise be left out if the couple were totally open to creating a new life.

No one should suggest we force people to have sex without contraceptives; that's impossible and unethical. But let's be faithful to our beliefs, not defeatist because our 7 billion person world is divided on one of our opinions.

"Keep your opinions to your unmarried self."

Nope. I explored this topic and completely changed my opinion of it. I'm now a young woman who looks forward to NFP and the discomfort that will accompany the abounding bond that it will bring with God and my husband.

Follow up: I recognize that many women take birth control as medical treatment for illness. While I still think there are alternatives for almost all cases, I recognize I am not in their position. If I was in this situation, I think I would try to follow NFP charting, while on the contraceptive medicine, so I can still keep the value for procreative sex, though my chances of producing a child are far less.

9 comments:

Emily said...

This is a wonderful post, Elizabeth. I like your last point. I'd do the same thing, but I'm going to try my best to live with PCOS without the BC they prescribe so quickly. I wish more people would realize how beautiful NFP is and how much it helps a marriage!

Rae said...

Good for you! I hate the "Keep your opinions to your unmarried self" as if somehow being single means you know nothing, or being married means you know everything.

Jessica said...

One quick note re: If I was in this situation, I think I would try to follow NFP charting, while on the contraceptive medicine, so I can still keep the value for procreative sex, though my chances of producing a child are far less.

I started charting in college, a few years before I got married, and then ended up taking birth control pills for a few months for a medical condition. Because the pill makes your body thinks it's pregnant, my basal temperature was high and flat the whole month and I had to stop charting until I was off it. So I don't think what you suggest is possible, though I realize you're trying to make the best of what you already consider not an ideal situation for someone to be in. In any case, it definitely solidified my decision never to take birth control once I got married because I could see visible evidence of what it was doing to my body.

Louise said...

I really enjoyed reading this post, Elizabeth!
I had to chuckle at "Are you naive enough to think that you can be married and not have sex when you want to?" Wow. My husband and I were married 4 years ago today, we're crazy in love, and we're both still naive enough to think that. It's not easy, but it's absolutely possible. Speaking only from my personal experience, I believe that chastity begets chastity. When you're used to acting on sexual urges while closing the door on life whenever you want, it's very difficult to fathom practicing periodic abstinence. But once you make the commitment to NFP, you are flooded with grace. No, it's not necessarily easy...but it becomes doable, not to mention spiritually edifying and rewarding!

Rae said...

"I believe that chastity begets chastity" Amen a hundred times over!

NFP relies on self-discipline, and self-discipline is a virtue like the rest of the virtues: the more you cultivate it, the easier it gets.

fireofthylove.com said...

I said it on twitter and I'll say it again here... I like that you capitalize the word Love. Love deserves it!

MCK said...

In Re: I've been asked questions like..."Are you naive enough to think that you can be married and not have sex when you want to?" Things like, "What about over-population?" And finally, "Don't you think you should keep your opinion to your unmarried self?"

Way to give awesome answers to those! I've been confronted in similar situations and it's always hard to stand up for what you believe in! Never forget that there are people who stand along side you! :)

Anonymous said...

Nice article

Anne said...

There has been an increasing issue regarding the use of contraceptives and birth control as part of an insurance plan. A lot of people support Obama's proposal to require private health insurance plans to cover the full cost of birth control for women. There are also some individuals who want to reject the propositions. In my case, if this could do good for the majority, then I think it's a good health care law to be implemented.

Private Health Insurance Australia

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